“Tell Them You Mean Business”

Massachusetts Motorcycle Helmet Laws Reduce Costs as Well as Biker Accident Injuries

 

 

Hot off the presses: motorcycle helmets don’t just save lives, they save money as well—a lot of money. When someone is involved in a motorcycle accident, the last thing on the injured biker’s mind is money, and yet in our society, money talks. So the Center for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a study from 2008 to 2010 to find out just how much is saved when motorcycle riders and passengers strap on a helmet before hitting the road.

According to the study, over $3 billion was saved in 2010 alone, with total costs saved due to helmet use ranging from $2.6 million in New Mexico to $394 million in California. Economic costs saved from helmet use per registered motorcycle ranged from $48 in New Mexico to $1,627 in North Carolina, with a median of $286. In Massachusetts, the savings was over $400 per registered motorcycle.

Massachusetts personal injury attorney Mark E. Salomone is always glad to hear of any new research that supports the prevention of motorcyclist injuries and their passengers. Having defended countless victims of motorcycle accident injuries, however, he knows how much helmets do to protect riders.  “Every time riders take their bikes to the streets,” he says, “they’re placing themselves at risk of serious injury and death. When a motorcyclist is hit by a distracted driver in a high-speed collision or if their bike has brake defects, helmets are even more crucial, as they can prevent serious head injuries and brain damage. ”

Over 40 percent of motorcyclists killed in accidents between 2008 and 2010 did not have a helmet on, says the CDC report. On the other hand, helmets reduced fatalities by 37 percent for motorcycle drivers and 41 percent for passengers, which translated to 1,544 fewer motorcyclist deaths in 2010.

In states where helmets are not required, 79 percent of the motorcyclists killed were not wearing one, compared to 12 percent in states where they are mandatory, the CDC said. Current Massachusetts motorcycle helmet law requires all motorcycle drivers and passengers to wear protective headgear, except when participating in parades.

The other positive message in this study is that every Massachusetts resident benefits when our state saves money, as it helps the overall local economy. Who knows if the CDC’s findings will inspire new helmet law legislation in states without it, but money talks so it wouldn’t be surprising if lawmakers in those states take up the cause—and it’s a good one.

 

If you or a loved one suffered motorcycle accident injuries, contact the tough, reliable attorneys at Massachusetts personal injury attorney, Mark E. Salomone. For a free and confidential consultation, call 1-800-WIN-WIN-1 or contact us online today. We can help fight for your rights.

The Law Offices of Mark E. Salomone
2 Oliver St #608
Boston, MA 02109